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Newsletter #7

We hope you’re enjoying our newsletters! You’ll find a lot of information packed in each one such as what’s keeping us busy right now, what stages different sets of livestock are in, product offering news, and much more!

One goal with this is to establish and nurture a direct relationship between you (the well-informed consumer) and us (a pasture-based farm). That’s something that industrial agriculture and supermarkets will never be able to fully duplicate. Thanks for your support and enjoy the latest from Watson Farms!


We have picked a name for this newsletter!

We appreciate all of the name suggestions you all have submitted. There were so many good ones it was very difficult to decide. So the new name of our newsletter is…

Pasture Posts

We will contact the winner this week to receive their $50 Watson Farms store credit! 


What’s keeping us busy.

It’s been an unusually busy week, so here’s a rundown of what we’ve been doing in order to continue to serve you with the highest quality pastured proteins possible!

Moving layer chickens

We house our layers in a re-purposed turkey barn during the cold, wet months of the year (usually early December to March).  We were a week or two delayed in moving them out this year as we were training a flock to lay in the nest boxes so we didn’t want to disturb them with a relocation until they were in good practice.

We use a deep bedding of pine shavings in our winter housing which keeps the birds dry, comfortable and warm.  The sides of the house have curtains that operate on a thermostat that go up to close the barn when it’s cold and go down to open the barn up when it’s warmer.  This keeps the birds comfortable during the worst winter weather.  

We also allow the layer chickens to access some pasture areas throughout the winter so that they can still forage some if they choose to.

Another reason we use stationary winter housing is to keep from making ruts in the fields when they’re wet.  We use a tractor to move the pasture houses and it can make a mess in our fields if it’s too wet.  

The hens venture out of the re-purposed turkey barn on a cold morning.
Continue reading Newsletter #7

Newsletter #6 and A Giveaway!

We hope you’re enjoying our newsletters!  You’ll find a lot of information packed in each one such as what’s keeping us busy right now, what stages different sets of livestock are in, product offering news, and much more! 

One goal with this is to establish and nurture a direct relationship between you (the well-informed consumer) and us (a pasture-based farm).  That’s something that industrial agriculture and supermarkets will never be able to fully duplicate.  Thanks for your support and enjoy the latest from Watson Farms!

***Be sure to scroll down to participate in an opportunity for a $50 store credit if you can help us come up with a name for this newsletter!***

What’s keeping us busy.

We first of all wanted to wish you a Happy Easter!  This is always a special time of year for our family because of the Resurrection, but also because of the massive renewal and regrowth that we see at this time each year.  It is wonderful encouragement to see pastures and livestock in such a state of vitality and rebirth!

After this Easter morning’s chores, the broilers and cattle herd are delighted in consuming the buffet of grasses and clover that this season has provided.

Speed Grazing!

Our grass is growing very fast right now and this requires us to move the cattle quickly over each paddock in order to “top” it and move them on to the next one.  Every time that a plant is clipped off it prunes it’s roots to mimic the top of the plant.  This is called biomimicry and is the key to carbon sequestration.  The plant will then try extra hard to re-grow what has been pruned off and to do so it uses sunlight through photosynthesis.  So what we’re doing here is using tightly grazed herbivores to power this cycle of photosynthesis and carbon sequestration. 

Here’s how Joel Salatin puts it in several of his books: Mob Stocking Herbivorous Solar Conversion Lignified Carbon Sequestration Fertilization.  While that’s a mouthful, it definitely encompasses everything we’re trying to do by moving our cattle in large mobs across the landscape so that we can provide the most positive impact possible for the environment, the cattle, the farmer, our neighbors, and the consumer.

Below is a video we made this week as well as some photos that illustrate some of this process.

Continue reading Newsletter #6 and A Giveaway!

High Density Grazing

With our spring grass at a very high rate of growth we are rotating our cattle over it very often and at a high density as well. This yields many benefits from the cattle’s rate of gain to soil health. We’re sequestering carbon while producing a premium quality grass-finished beef product. It’s truly a win for all involved!