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Regenerative agriculture blends in with the landscape and doesn’t dominate it. – Pasture Posts #31

Attention: Scroll down for an important announcement about store hours!

As Kelly, the kids, and I went on a semi-working vacation to the beach this past week, one thing that came to mind was just how much of a responsibility there is for those who touch the natural landscapes and ecosystems the most to do it in such a way that has a positive impact rather than a negative one.  We definitely don’t believe as some do that any human touch on the environment is inherently negative, but we take the view that if we use the right methods we can actually leave an ecosystem better than we found it.  

As livestock farmers we have a tight line to walk when it comes to this, and we definitely have areas that we could improve.  But we feel like we have taken important steps toward positive ecological impacts, and are doing more good than harm instead of vice versa like a vast majority of farms in the US continue to do.  

One over-arching principle of the kind of pasture-based farming that we do is that the systems we use should blend in with the natural landscapes as much as possible.  These types of systems and infrastructure are generally portable.  Take our broiler pens for example:  they weigh a few hundred pounds each and they travel over the undulating pastures with ease.  We didn’t have to move thousands of cubic yards of dirt just to build a stationary confinement house that would harbor disease due to overcrowding and lack of sunshine.  

Another example is how we finish our cattle.  We don’t park them in feedlot pens where we have to haul feed to them and manure away.  Rather, we let them walk from paddock to paddock each day where they are excited to receive fresh forage and where they leave behind wonderful organic fertilizer that they distribute themselves.  It’s truly a win for all involved.  

Our methods for hog production offer the same type of benefits.  Industrial pigs live on concrete slatted floors where the manure slurry that flows beneath them is a constant source of stress and disease.  Our pigs are continuously rotated to fresh pasture where they live until the day that we harvest them.  This keeps them away from their own manure and they ingest tons of grass while enjoying their non-GMO grain ration as well.  

Take a look at the photos below to see some of these methods in action and a couple from our trip!


Product Spotlight

Regenerative practices make for better pork that you can eat with confidence. They get fresh pasture every 7 days and they never see concrete or a confinement house.  Taste the difference yourself and stock up on our breakfast sausage while it is on sale!  (By the way, check out the deep discount on the 40-lb bundle!)

You can see ALL of our ON SALE products with the button below.


We re-use packaging!

We’ve seen a good response to our efforts in re-using packaging! Thanks and keep it up.  

You can help us reduce our carbon footprint by returning your CLEAN egg cartons and meat boxes. 

The main reason that we switched to plastic egg cartons a while back was because they are so much more durable than paper which could only be used once.  They also protect the eggs much better!

So if you have some egg cartons or boxes to return, you can just place them on your porch on your home delivery day.  Farm pickup customers can, of course, drop them off when you come to pick up your new order.  

Thanks for helping us re-use our packaging!


Referral Program

If you enjoy our products please consider passing the word along to your neighbors, friends and family!  We don’t spend a lot of money of advertising but rather depend on customers like yourself to advertise for us if they are amazed by our products and customer service.

All you have to do is refer someone to us and when they place an order for the first time they will get a link to a form where they can say who referred them.  You and the new customer will receive a $15 credit!  So make sure they tell us your name.  Hit the button for more info!


Order Deadlines and Store Hours

We will be processing chickens later this week and the first half of next week. This is very labor intensive so we have to close the store during this time. Thanks for your patience as we harvest your pastured chicken.

Modified Farm Store / Order Pickup hours are as follows:

Thursday, Sept. 30: Open 1pm – 6pm
Friday, Oct. 1: Open 1pm – 6pm
Saturday, Oct. 2: Normal hours (10am – 2pm)
Monday, Oct. 4: Open 1pm – 6pm
Tuesday, Oct. 5: Open 1pm – 6pm
Closed on Wednesdays and Sundays as usual.

All deliveries will continue as usual.

Order Deadlines

Charleston: 12 noon Mondays
GSP: 12 noon on Wednesdays
Charlotte/Rock Hill: 12 noon Fridays
Farm Pickup:  Please wait until you receive an email stating that your order is ready to be picked up (usually 1 business day from when you place your order). 

Produce Box Ordering Deadlines

Sundays at 9pm for Charleston or Columbia Home Deliveries
Tuesdays at 9pm for GSP and CLT/Local Home Deliveries


Did you know that we have a webpage that displays all the reviews we have received?  

Check it out!

Check out this ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ review:

“I have now bought two whole beef from Watson Farms. The meat is excellent. I drive over four hours just to be able to support something that is not just wonderful quality and a good deal, but also a moral choice that does good for a neighbor, the animals, and the earth. There is no downside. I only wish I could encourage more people to buy in bulk and from this wonderful family/farm. Thank you guys!”

We would greatly appreciate it if you would be kind enough to leave us a review.  It helps first-time customers purchase with confidence.


Thanks again for being partners in this endeavor of local, pasture-raised proteins that has truly transformed our farm.  We look forward to continuing this transition while serving you long into the future.

Sincerely,

The Watsons


Pasture Posts is written by Matt Watson.

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